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Remote Risk Assessment for Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

Posted on March 01, 2021
Medically reviewed by
Allen J. Blaivas, D.O.
Article written by
Bethany J. Sanstrum, Ph.D.

  • Doctors can perform risk assessment for pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) using telemedicine.
  • For a doctor to assess risk remotely, you must accurately report all PAH symptoms.
  • Studies show remote risk assessment can be effective for managing PAH treatment.

For people living with pulmonary arterial hypertension, frequent doctors’ appointments are vital for managing their condition. Risk assessment — estimation of the risk of death within one year — is key for monitoring disease progression and response to treatment. During the COVID-19 pandemic, it has become more difficult to access in-person health care. Fortunately, there is evidence that accurate self-reporting can make it possible for PAH specialists to effectively assess risk remotely.

Learn more about the role of risk assessment in managing PAH.

How Can Risk Assessment Be Remote?

Doctors have honed the ability to perform accurate risk assessment via telemedicine, or online doctors’ visits, during the COVID-19 pandemic. Remote risk assessment relies on accurate self-reporting by people with PAH, especially when measuring functional capacity and mobility. Recent studies show that patient-reported outcomes can be an effective method to support the disease management of people living with PAH.

Assessing PAH Risk Factors Without a Physical Exam

The Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension-Symptoms and Impact questionnaire (PAH-SYMPACT) is a particularly helpful tool for collecting accurate patient-reported outcomes for PAH. This measure covers nine “domains,” including respiratory and cardiovascular symptom domains, as well as the impact domains of physical activities, daily activities, social impact, cognition, and emotional impact. This questionnaire has been tested and verified in a variety of clinical trials.

Furthermore, common risk assessment tools for PAH, such as the U.S. Registry to Evaluate Early and Long-Term PAH Disease Management (REVEAL) 2.0 and the European Society of Cardiology/European Respiratory Society guidelines, do not require routine physical exams. The required measurements, such as heart rate and systolic blood pressure, can be monitored at home. This allows risk assessment to be performed more easily via telehealth appointments.

Read more about how risk is assessed in PAH.

What To Expect During Remote PAH Risk Assessment

Telemedicine appointments are typically on video chat platforms, allowing you and your doctor to see each other. These telecommunications can then be incorporated into your medical record. If you do not have a stable internet connection or do not feel comfortable with new technologies, you can also have a telemedicine visit over the phone. There are many ways a physician can monitor PAH during a telemedicine appointment.

Reporting PAH Symptoms

Clinical history and an interview with your doctor are important for monitoring the progression of PAH and for adjusting PAH therapy. Be sure to report even minor changes in your condition. Even the most subtle worsening of symptoms could be significant to your doctor and affect your current treatment regimen.

Measuring Vital Signs, Function, and Capacity

Your doctor may also ask you to use home health-monitoring devices, such as smartwatches, scales, apps, and pulse oximeters, to take certain physical measurements. Some of the things a doctor may ask you about or monitor during a telehealth visit include:

  • Blood pressure
  • Weight
  • Oxygen saturation
  • Cardiac rhythm
  • Mobility or walk distance
  • Six-minute walk test (6MWT) results
  • Incremental shuttle walk test (ISWT) results

Overall, telemedicine has helped lower the rate of missed appointments by making visits more convenient and reducing people’s anxiety about coming to a hospital during the coronavirus pandemic.

Does Remote Risk Assessment Really Work?

Telehealth visits are not new. Even before the COVID-19 pandemic, telehealth visits were scheduled between in-person visits to monitor a variety of conditions, including cardiovascular diseases. In a 2010 study, regular telehealth visits for people with heart failure reduced the rates of hospitalizations and death.

In a 2016 study, the use of wireless electronic devices that send daily information to a clinical nurse about a person’s vital signs — including blood pressure, heart rate, and weight — led to improved 180-day quality of life scores in participants with heart failure. Clinical trials such as these help to validate at-home monitoring visits as an alternative to standard, in-person clinic visits.

Maintaining a proper monitoring schedule is key for managing PAH. Telehealth appointments to monitor PAH symptoms and assess risk are an effective way to update your doctor on your condition and make sure your treatment plan is working for you.

References

  1. Risk assessment in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension in the era of COVID 19 pandemic and the telehealth revolution: State of the art review — The Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation
  2. Structured telephone support or telemonitoring programmes for patients with chronic heart failure — The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews
  3. Effectiveness of remote patient monitoring after discharge of hospitalized patients with heart failure: the Better Effectiveness After Transition — Heart Failure (BEAT-HF) randomized clinical trial — JAMA Internalized Medicine
  4. Development of the Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension-Symptoms and Impact (PAH-SYMPACT®) questionnaire: a new patient-reported outcome instrument for PAH — Respiratory Research
Allen J. Blaivas, D.O. is certified by the American Board of Internal Medicine in Critical Care Medicine, Pulmonary Disease, and Sleep Medicine. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Learn more about him here.
Bethany J. Sanstrum, Ph.D. holds a doctorate in cell and molecular biology with a specialization in neuroscience from the University of Hawaii at Manoa. Learn more about her here.

A myPHteam Member said:

No thank God! But spend a lot of time in hospital with asperation phenomina. Not to hit of speller.

posted 19 days ago

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