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Real members of myPHteam have posted questions and answers that support our community guidelines, and should not be taken as medical advice. Looking for the latest medically reviewed content by doctors and experts? Visit our resource section.

What Exercises Are Good For PH?

What Exercises Are Good For PH?

My legs pain me at the top and I have a lot of breathing problems. Short of breath and a tightness in my stomach.

A myPHteam Member said:

Introduction to Exercise
A PHA Classroom Video Resource Guide
PHAClassroom.org
Regular exercise can improve exercise capacity,
muscle function and quality of life for patients
with various types of pulmonary hypertension
(PH).
The Introduction to Exercise video is the first in a series on exercises that can be appropriate for
people with PH. This video includes information
on PH and how the heart, lungs and muscles
can benefit from exercise. It gives an overview
of three types of exercise for you to discuss with
your doctor:
1. Yoga to improve flexibility and confidence.
2. Strength training with light weights,
resistance bands and small household
objects.
3. Aerobic exercise to improve cardiovascular
health.
The exercises in the PHA Classroom Exercise
Series are examples of workouts that are
appropriate for some people. Always talk with
your PH doctor before beginning an exercise
routine. He or she might be able to suggest a
pulmonary rehabilitation program where you
can learn more in a safe setting.
Objectives: The goal of the PHA Classroom Exercise Series is to provide people with
pulmonary hypertension (PH) information on improving endurance, muscle strength and
quality of life through three broad fitness categories: flexibility, strength and cardio. This video
series by the Pulmonary Hypertension Association is designed to give you information you
need to work with your doctor and pulmonary rehabilitation program to tailor an exercise
routine that is right for you.
• Plan to exercise when you have the most
energy.
• Always exercise with a partner and never
alone.
• If there is furniture around, ensure it’s out of
the way in case you lose your balance.
• Don’t hold your breath during exercise.
• You shouldn’t feel exhausted, light-headed
or dizzy during exercise. You might feel some
shortness of breath, but you should always
be able to talk and feel in control. If you
don’t, slow down and regain control of your
breathing. Contact your doctor or call 911 if
your shortness of breath doesn’t ease after
five minutes of rest.
• Your doctor might use your results from a
six-minute walk, supervised exercise treadmill
or bicycle test to help you create a safe plan
for exercise.
• Include a warmup and cool-down into your
exercise routine. It might take you more time
to warm up than people who don’t have PH.
Don’t feel discouraged if you need a longer
warmup.
• Start small and work up. If you feel tired,
you have found the limit of what you can
do today. You’re stronger than you were
yesterday.
Safe Exercise Tips

posted 11 months ago
A myPHteam Member said:

Pulmonary Hypertension
Exercise For Pulmonary Hypertension

Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a rare, severe lung condition caused by narrowed or blocked pulmonary arteries. The disease is characterized by high blood pressure and affects the vessels responsible for transporting blood from the heart to the lungs. Because additional effort is needed to pump the blood, the right heart ventricle becomes stressed, which can lead to enlargement and weakening of the heart and consequently right heart failure.
While no cure currently exists for pulmonary hypertension, some treatments approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) are designed to accompany behavioral alterations to help patients cope with the disease. Exercise is one of the behavioral alterations.
When medically supervised, exercise can help patients improve symptoms that include shortness of breath (dyspnea); fatigue; dizziness or fainting spells (syncope); pressure or pain in the chest; swelling (edema) in the ankles, legs, and abdomen (ascites); a bluish color to the lips and skin (cyanosis); and irregular heartbeat.
However, the paradox of PH remains that exercise is made more difficult by the disease’s symptoms. The current FDA-approved therapies for PH are mostly designed to make exercise that could lead to improved health in pulmonary hypertension more tolerable.
Benefits of Exercise For Pulmonary Hypertension Sufferers
Not a lot of substantial information exists regarding the impact of exercising for patients with pulmonary hypertension, but it is generally believed by researchers that people who struggle with the disease can benefit from moderate and regular exercise.
Even patients with severe PH can see improvement from exercise because toned muscles use oxygen more efficiently than flaccid muscles. Regular exercise increases cardiovascular and muscular fitness, controls weight, and decreases the risk of systemic hypertension and heart disease. Additionally, while improving PH symptoms, exercise reduces the risk of other chronic such as diabetes, improves mood and combats depression.
Pulmonary and Cardio Rehabilitation is one place to start.

edited, originally posted 11 months ago
A myPHteam Member said:

Thank you for your help. It is greatly appreciated! ♥️

posted about 2 months ago
A myPHteam Member said:

PHAClassroom.org
This. Org site can show exercise techniques
Always ask your PH Dr before you start exercising.

edited, originally posted 11 months ago
A myPHteam Member said:

Introduction to Exercise
A PHA Video Resource Guide
PHAClassroom.org

Regular exercise can improve exercise capacity,
muscle function and quality of life for patients
with various types of pulmonary hypertension
(PH).
The Introduction to Exercise video is the first in a series on exercises that can be appropriate for people with PH.
This video includesinformation
on PH and how the heart, lungs and muscles
can benefit from exercise. It gives an overview
of three types of exercise for you to discuss with
your doctor:
1. Yoga to improve flexibility and confidence.
2. Strength training with light weights,
resistance bands and small household
objects.
3. Aerobic exercise to improve cardiovascular
health.
The exercises in the PHA Classroom Exercise
Series are examples of workouts that are
appropriate for some people. Always talk with
your PH doctor before beginning an exercise
routine. He or she might be able to suggest a
pulmonary rehabilitation program where you
can learn more in a safe setting.
Objectives: The goal of the PHA Classroom Exercise Series is to provide people with
pulmonary hypertension (PH) information on improving endurance, muscle strength and
quality of life through three broad fitness categories: flexibility, strength and cardio. This video
series by the Pulmonary Hypertension Association is designed to give you information you
need to work with your doctor and pulmonary rehabilitation program to tailor an exercise
routine that is right for you.
• Plan to exercise when you have the most
energy.
• Always exercise with a partner and never
alone.
• If there is furniture around, ensure it’s out of
the way in case you lose your balance.
• Don’t hold your breath during exercise.
• You shouldn’t feel exhausted, light-headed
or dizzy during exercise. You might feel some
shortness of breath, but you should always
be able to talk and feel in control. If you
don’t, slow down and regain control of your
breathing. Contact your doctor or call 911 if
your shortness of breath doesn’t ease after
five minutes of rest.
• Your doctor might use your results from a
six-minute walk, supervised exercise treadmill
or bicycle test to help you create a safe plan
for exercise.
• Include a warmup and cool-down into your
exercise routine. It might take you more time
to warm up than people who don’t have PH.
Don’t feel discouraged if you need a longer
warmup.
• Start small and work up. If you feel tired,
you have found the limit of what you can
do today. You’re stronger than you were
yesterday.
Safe Exercise Tips

posted 11 months ago
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